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Where Do Floral Artists Get Their Inspiration From? – Rebekah ,Ritina ,Mary ,Claire!

Watch & Listen to this podcast Episode.

Welcome back to the Arts To Hearts Podcast! In this final episode of our series on the “Floral Art Book,” Charuka Arora is thrilled to introduce four remarkable artists featured in the publication. Despite the series wrapping up, there’s still a chance to grab your copy of this inspiring book available on various platforms, including Amazon.

During this episode, Charuka is joined by Marie, Claire, Ritina, and Rebekah, all of whom have contributed their unique artistic talents to the “101 Floral Art Book.” Each artist shares insights into their personal journey, their artistic medium, and the inspiration behind their work.

  • Marie Younkin, based in Brooklyn, is a painter who primarily works with water-based media such as acrylics, gouache, and watercolor, often incorporating vibrant neon pigments.
  • Claire Elliott from Portland, Oregon, focuses on oil paintings and has a profound connection to nature, which deeply influences her artwork.
  • Ritina, originally from India and now residing in Tennessee, expresses her art through both acrylics and oils. Her work predominantly features landscapes, capturing the serene and wild aspects of her surroundings.
  • Rebekah, located just north of Seattle, Washington, is a watercolor artist who draws significant inspiration from her previous coastal living, frequently portraying tropical flowers and scenic views.

The discussion delves into the motivations that drive these artists, exploring the deep-seated compulsion to create and how personal experiences, such as motherhood and surroundings, shape their artistic narratives. Each artist’s story provides a glimpse into the challenges and triumphs of living a creative life, emphasizing the constant evolution and the personal fulfillment derived from art.

ChapterTimestampDetails
Introduction00:00.00Charuka introduces the final episode of the series and mentions the availability of the “Floral Art Book.”
Guest Introductions00:49.50 to 01:35.86Introduction of guests: Marie, Claire, Ritina, and Rebekah, each sharing their base location and primary art medium.
Discussion on Art and Inspiration02:04.63 to 06:02.81Artists discuss their inspirations, the role of their environment, and personal life events in their art.
Deep Dive into Personal Motivations06:16.18 to 09:16.25Each artist shares personal stories about why they chose the path of art, focusing on compulsion, inspiration, and the impact of motherhood.
Artist Reflections on Book Participation18:15.75 to 30:16.91Artists reflect on their experiences participating in the “Floral Art Book,” appreciating the communication and collaboration process.
Conclusion and Goodbyes30:41.39 to 31:03.82Closing remarks, with Charuka thanking the guests and artists sharing where listeners can find and support their work.

00:00.00
charukaarora
Hey guys welcome back to the arts two hus podcast this is chara and I’m very very excited for the last episode of our series from the floral art book that we’ve recently published and you can still get your hands on I have 3 4 not 1 not 2 but 4 amazing artists from one zero one floral art book and like you know by now we’re here to introduce them to you. They were who they are what they do and in that process if you still haven’t wrapped your copy I remind you to please take your copy. From our website Amazon and other places. Everything mentioned in the show notes of this episode and now I am very excited to welcome our guest for today. Welcome everybody.

00:49.50
Rebekah
Thank you.

00:50.13
Ritina
Um, intimate.

00:50.52
Mary Younkin
Thank you.

00:53.90
Claire Elliott
Can’t.

00:54.53
charukaarora
okay um okay I have Marie Claire Ritina and Rebecca all of those 4 artists who’ve been a part of our book and I’m very excited to have 4 of you. How about we start with a little intro of who you are where you joining from. And then we’ll grab from there.

01:16.10
charukaarora
Who’s going first. Maybe you can go I can see you on the top.

01:20.21
Mary Younkin
Oh hi I’m Mary um, I’m joining from Brooklyn and yeah, I’m a painter I primarily work in water-based ah mediums like acrylics and. sh and watercolor and um, use a lot of neon pigments in my work.

01:35.86
charukaarora
Wonderful. What about you claire.

01:40.36
Claire Elliott
Ah, hi I’m Claire I’m in Portland Oregon and I’m a painter and I work in oil for the most part.

01:48.55
charukaarora
Wonderful. What about you ritina.

01:51.66
Ritina
Yeah I am withina I’m from originally from India but I’m staying in Tennessee so I’m Inie work in acrylics and oils. So it’s 4 of acrylics lesser wilds and I’m more of a landscape artist.

02:04.63
charukaarora
Okay, wonderful. How about you? Rebecca.

02:09.83
Rebekah
I my I’m Rebecca St and I’m hey I’m just north to Claire I’m up in the Seattle Washington area yeah so um, I’m a watercolor artist and kind of have more of a oh thank you Ikea it’s.

02:15.47
charukaarora
Um, okay.

02:19.32
charukaarora
I Love the Background. Oh I feel like a self a wipe. There.

02:25.68
Rebekah
But um, in our house for like 12 years I love this thing. It’s coming handy. Yeah and it kind of ties into my art I ah used to live at the beach and I kind of bring back to a lot of the like tropical flowers I’m drawn to and schenics and stuff. Yeah, yeah.

02:32.94
Ritina
Um.

02:36.62
charukaarora
Oh Wow makes sense I can connect the dots here. Wonderful same here. Okay, guys tell me something um, can somebody tell me anybody can start. Why do you feel? um.

02:43.22
Rebekah
So nice to meet you all.

02:54.40
charukaarora
What makes you an artist. Why are you pursuing? What is your first intention of being an artist. Why are you doing what you’re doing what’s your one you know we call that nots star or the reason of who we are um, can anybody start in you know I just want to know. Why you’re doing what you’re doing what really calls you to be an artist because we all know it’s not It’s terribly hard. A lot of times you know we think about what being an artist means versus when you actually walk down that path. It completely looks differently every day you know there’s so many highs and lows. In spite of that you all you’re here. Ah mary do you want to talk about it. What’s the number 1 reason of doing what you’re doing.

03:37.90
Mary Younkin
Yeah, oh um, oh my gosh I don’t know I mean I feel like it’s a compulsion at this point it’s like ah a drive to you know document my experience of the world and and also like share a narrative share. Ah, my vantage point with other people. So it’s It’s a lot about so a desire to be a storyteller.

04:02.26
charukaarora
Um, okay, might about you Claire.

04:05.44
Claire Elliott
I I agree on the idea of it being a compulsion I think I’ve found that even when I’m working in you know other jobs. Ah all I want to do is sort of come back to something creative I have a hard time sitting still and not not making something.

04:07.54
charukaarora
Okay.

04:23.20
Claire Elliott
And I feel so frequently inspired by the world around me, you know my my work is all based on nature. Ah, and so it’s very hard for me not to see something and immediately want to go make a painting of it.

04:35.60
charukaarora
I like that. What about you? retina.

04:38.55
Ritina
Yeah, for me, it’s the child hobby really I’ve always been an artist since I was like again I’ve always liked to paint and after I came to Tennessee I didn’t have a job right here. So I said let me just start off paying as a hobby and it slowly to your profession.

04:41.97
charukaarora
Okay, okay, okay, okay, okay, okay.

04:58.38
Ritina
And 1 thing I really love is the nature over here. It’s really beautiful. So anything aesthetically beautiful, really inspires me to paint it I just need to get it down on canvas. Yeah exactly yes.

05:10.95
charukaarora
Okay, no beauty always calls What about you Rebec I get that very soft or I feel like you’re this beachy person I I can’t connect the dots with your work right now. But I’m looking forward to it.

05:17.20
Ritina
Definition.

05:29.49
Rebekah
Well I um I just I ah have always painted to and it’s something I think just genetically and pre just predist of pre fileer like can’t say that word right now. But I just love to do and I um I feel weird when I’m not creating or painting.

05:34.18
Ritina
Be.

05:45.54
Rebekah
And I think it’s a way to tell a story but a way that like like Mary said and it’s a really a fun way to connect with people to um and it’s it’s fun to be able to create something beautiful from your perspective and put it out under the world and feels good. So.

06:02.81
charukaarora
Okay, okay, tell me something Do you have a story where you feel like okay, any moment in life a fail. Okay I want to be an artist like this is what I’m going to do I know? Oh oh.

06:16.18
Rebekah
It was not trying my son. It was interesting. Yeah I kind of propelled because I I used to just be kind of a little bit like um, go go go all up all La La La I had to have to go this half the best that it just grounded me and forced me to just really focus on. Um.

06:24.18
charukaarora
Oh okay, okay.

06:29.80
Ritina
And.

06:34.20
Rebekah
Art and it kind of was interesting having becoming a mob just kind of was a big shift for me. So.

06:37.82
charukaarora
Okay, does anybody else resonate with this idea any any anymore mothers out of you or Garriina as a manner. Oh my goodness. Okay.

06:44.60
Ritina
Yes, me I’m a mother I have at twentyify year own son? Yes, yeah, yes and he’s also into designing so he’s automotive designer and ah so maybe was art was always there with me.

06:56.53
charukaarora
Okay. Okay.

07:01.73
Ritina
I was always stuck up like kind of I never put him for teaching classes or anything but that so so was stuck up teaching him and like taking care of him and all that stuff once he went to college I had all the time in the world. So that’s when I started to like pursue it more as.

07:15.30
charukaarora
Um, and to be your staff.

07:16.23
Mary Younkin
Um, a second.

07:20.32
charukaarora
Did you think it to for it to be a career at that point. Okay, when did you come 2018 okay

07:21.22
Ritina
Career like I’d say and no no I didn’t but the thing was when I came here to the United States of America as as I said 2018 january yeah, so when I came Tennessee is extremely beautiful. It’s more of a rural rural area. So. It’s really beautiful. So um and just looking at the beauty just I just needed to have that down on canvas and then people started enjoying my artworks and this really started buying them from me. That’s when I said okay, let’s convert this into a profession.

07:55.94
charukaarora
Um, okay oh Wow anybody else’s who’s man you do have a story to share.

07:55.97
Mary Younkin
Both. Yeah, and I guess I also have ah a young child and he’s going to be 3 coming up. Um, so I think that ah it changed the way that I paint um in a lot of ways and I sort of have a.

08:09.79
Ritina
Um.

08:14.10
charukaarora
Fun.

08:19.82
Mary Younkin
Processes I can use to like you know make little changes in the studio when I have time and incrementally grow the practice and also I’ve changed the vantage point of my paintings to specifically be like my vantage point of being an artist’s mother. So like the last couple years. A lot of my still lives have are now kind of like putting the viewer in like my position where you’re looking at like ah you know boys on the floor or you’re looking at you’re looking at my apartment in like the chaos and the things that are going on in my daily life and um.

08:44.78
charukaarora
Not all.

08:55.32
Mary Younkin
Trying to be more vulnerable and like share those moments with with the viewer I think it made me feel as a mother feel like I need my art is also a part of my identity and my my personal self as an artist and ah a person aside from being a mother.

09:02.98
charukaarora
Yeah. Home.

09:09.97
Mary Younkin
So it’s really important for me to have that um that voice even if it is reflecting my my identity as a mother as well. Yeah.

09:16.25
charukaarora
And get it wonderful Claire. What about you goodness all of you. How do you manage.

09:23.85
Claire Elliott
I Yeah I have I have two young kids and I think it. Um I I Yeah I’ve got ah um I found that it’s It’s focused my studio work pretty and pretty clearly in terms of you know when.

09:31.82
Ritina
Um, any.

09:35.13
charukaarora
Okay.

09:41.00
Claire Elliott
When do I go work that time is very precious. Ah you know now they’re they’re both, they’re in like preschool and elementary school and so I’m able to have a bit more time during the day. But. I think it has it has changed both my focus in terms of my practice but it has also changed my focus and my perspective in terms of the work that I’ve been making um my work used to be much more much broader. Um landscape and I’ve gotten so ah so like specific about. Flowers and plants and nature and thinking about looking at things from the perspective of a child like how your whole world can become sort of just like 1 object one plant and also looking at it. Um in terms of like.

10:16.80
Ritina
Um, any.

10:17.45
charukaarora
Oh Wow I like that.

10:29.64
Claire Elliott
Ah, detail is maybe all I can muster right now because I don’t have time to spend months working on a really large piece.

10:34.35
charukaarora
Time. Yeah yeah, very interesting I think I love the idea when you you know like you said you’re looking at um flowers is symbolism for children. Um my question towards this is also to all of you like you know what are your thoughts and. You know lot of time artists feel stuck a have you felt that way B How did you resume that or solve that um when it comes to finding you know the style the creative voice The subject matter. Can we talk a little bit about how you have evolved in your own Journeys. On what kind of subject Matters. You’ve been working on to what you’re doing now and how do you find your style who’s going to go first. Anybody who? yes.

11:20.42
Claire Elliott
Um I can talk more about that since I was sort of talking about the shift in my work after Parenthood um my in terms of like my style I’m very I’m very interested in how the paint moves on the campus and I’m just sort of interested in the materiality of the paint.

11:35.28
charukaarora
And.

11:39.74
Claire Elliott
And I find that I’m a very responsive painter. So I sort of dive right in and then I adjust the colors I Just the composition sort of based on what’s already on the canvas speaking to me? Um, but like I was saying I used to have these sort of very pulled back Landscapes painting a lot of like large gardens and stuff.

11:41.28
charukaarora
Okay.

11:44.52
Ritina
Um.

11:51.38
charukaarora
Um, okay, are.

11:59.53
Claire Elliott
And I have over time gotten much more interested in individual plants. Ah and sort of the the worlds and compositions that can exist sort of much more close up. Um, that can be sort of overwhelming in a different way from looking at a. Large space all at once.

12:18.24
charukaarora
Wonderful. No Regina Do you want to go next.

12:24.20
Ritina
Yeah, technical. So for me, it’s always been landscapes. It’s 1 thing I really love doing so I started off on paper I’d say it’s for kind. Yeah I used to but that was kind of um, just novel kind of painting.

12:29.99
charukaarora
Before coming to Tennessee as well. Okay.

12:39.96
Ritina
With watercolors which I really didn’t um, do too Well as I felt that way and slowly when I came here I started off painting on cartridge paper and then I realized that it soaps in the color and the paper gets kind of all like wonky kind of so I didn’t want that to happen. So I started.

12:48.83
charukaarora
Um, okay mom.

12:59.53
Ritina
19 I started painting on canvas. My first canvas was a very small one 12 or 16 I guess and um painted a barn one of my friends just loved it and that was the first painting that I sold to a friend of mine. Yeah.

13:11.86
charukaarora
You sold.

13:16.15
Ritina
And it was really kind of um Lord I say it it kind of opened out things for me that yes I can go into all this and make it happen and so slowly and then for me the main thing was painting on larger pieces.

13:31.62
charukaarora
Okay, wonderful. Oh.

13:33.28
Ritina
So the largest I paint is a 36 by 24 and that was again a landscape and for me another thing I’d say was I prefer to be versatile. So like it’s not only landscapes I contain whatever looks aesthetically beautiful for me.

13:48.46
charukaarora
Wonderful being 1 subject. Yeah.

13:50.50
Ritina
So I’ve transitioned that way slowly from um and if you see my paintings. Yeah, if you see my paintings around 2019 know so when you see them now. There is a lot of difference I I’m totally self- taughtugh so I used to watch videos I always wanted to join some art school and I didn’t get to do that. So.

14:01.69
charukaarora
Okay, okay. My look at you you hear.

14:10.40
Mary Younkin
Person.

14:10.42
Ritina
Just yes so and for me a photo realism is 1 thing which I I like I try to make it as like copy the photo finder with it should look really, you could step into it or something like that. So I I know I still need to. Improve on that. But yes I’m getting there and I will be and I will be there. Definitely.

14:30.23
charukaarora
We’re always evolving what about you mary.

14:36.83
Mary Younkin
Um, I think that for me I So I have a very like and observational approach to painting and I like looking at the world around me I like looking at I I studied portraiture and I studied you know, still life.

14:42.23
charukaarora
Okay.

14:51.87
Ritina
Computer.

14:51.97
Mary Younkin
And for me, it’s like breaking my own rules and I think that helps me get unstuck. So I’m I’m trying to incorporate more natural elements or more flowers as you know, kind of breaking through the the still life or breaking you know having a relationship with the objects nature kind of coming into the paintings.

15:07.82
charukaarora
But he me what? what.

15:11.17
Mary Younkin
Or color playing a really big role in the paintings as well. Um, not being afraid to use like really vibrant colors that might be disjointed or incorporate neon colors in the work. So and part of it is like kind of just you know.

15:25.90
charukaarora
Oh yeah, who I love that? No I think it’s amazing to hear how each one of us are.

15:27.60
Mary Younkin
Being able to let loose within that very analytical mindset and also challenge yourself and and push yourself a little a little farther than you’re comfortable. Um I think that really helps me.

15:43.41
charukaarora
Even while we are attracted to very similar things how we translate them how we look at them differently like you know for someone. It’s an expression of their surroundings for someone. It’s an expression of what’s happening in their life. I love Claire’s idea of looking at them. You know and looking at flowers as children now I’m going to pull out. Specific works that we have of yours in the book and I’d love to hear the stories and you know your thoughts and you know why did you make it and anything else that you want to share with us I will start with I have I think I have class first on my screen and it’s called midsummer seed heads.

16:17.43
Ritina
At any.

16:21.76
charukaarora
It’s an all on Lenin 14 by 15 and I can see these lots of greens a blue sky the wall and um, the flowers claire. Do you want to talk about this artwork and you know what it means and what it was in your mind.

16:36.54
Claire Elliott
Sure, Um, it’s from a series of paintings that’s sort of still ongoing for me about the concept of plant Blindness which is something that I had heard about. Ah.

16:42.76
charukaarora
Okay.

16:47.14
Ritina
It.

16:48.73
Claire Elliott
Like a year ago I think and it’s the idea it’s sort of like a twofold idea one is that um we so often are surrounded by nature in our daily lives particularly those of us who live in cities that we just are completely unaware of you know you don’t really notice the trees that are planted on the street. You don’t really notice like.

16:54.40
charukaarora
But but.

17:08.27
Claire Elliott
The greenery that’s growing between sidewalk cracks because it’s just not really interesting to us and then the other is that we just don’t really know what most plants are even and so 1 thing that I had been thinking a lot about last summer was how we recognize plants and flowers when they’re in their most. Iconic faces. You know we look when you a rose that’s blooming you know it’s a rose but when you see it in the winter time you maybe do not recognize exactly what plant that is um and so this is ah the painting is it’s allium and there’s some like delphinium and larksburg plants that like.

17:27.68
charukaarora
Right? yeah.

17:37.20
charukaarora
Um, yes.

17:45.41
Claire Elliott
People might generally recognize even if they don’t know the name and you know when it’s blooming but this is at the end of the summer when they’re actually in kind of the most important part of their phase which is the seed heads are all you know, completely full and bursting and they’re you know about to plant the seeds for the next season so that the. Plant can continue onwards but to us they’re sort of unusual and alien looking and you can’t really connect that beautiful flower from the springtime to this sort of strange thing in your garden at the end of the season.

18:15.75
charukaarora
Wonderful. What about you etina I will pick up yours next and let me hear what you have to say okay I have I have your work once a. Missed you? Okay, no I have Marie we have you I have you next on my screen Marie your work is this floescent yellow I know you all of you can’t see each other’s work. But once we’re over this call I’m sure.

18:47.24
Mary Younkin
Who was.

18:51.89
charukaarora
We can Google each other. Oh we can also check our drives. You can check our drives. Um, what’s interesting. It’s called a soup can for a brick a flower for a movement There are these flowers and behind these flowers. These are little cans peeping from behind and it’s a very bright. And for some reason I do also feed. There is a candy but it’s also a part of the flower or something like that I can have my ways of interpreting it and I love how you’ve titled it but can you talk a little bit more about it.

19:22.86
Mary Younkin
Yeah, and this is kind of ah part of my series I started in 2020 called my flower power series and you know it was kind of birthed from. You know, being isolated in my studio you know during lockdown and wanting to sort of create. Some sort of resistance like from myself within my studio and also create this vibrancy. So you know there was multiple paintings, large paintings, small paintings all with these very vibrant neon color palettes using floral motifs that I got from design patterns some of them from you know. Observations of flowers in real life and just bringing that nature and that power of nature into my studio was really transformative also seeing the flower as like a symbol of like feminine feminine resistance. So like you know with the flower flower mut movement of the seventy s and. How do we resist peacefullyfully and how do we use flowers as like a symbol of power. Um, and then the soup cans for me the title sort of derived from um one of the many silly comments that Trump made at the time about protesters. You know, using soup cans instead of bricks.

20:35.27
charukaarora
Awareness.

20:37.17
Mary Younkin
And it just you know at this point it doesn’t really like matter anymore. The the origin of it because there’s been many silly comments since then ah that have you know, surpassed that but I just remember thinking about like okay like if a soup can is if food is now like a weapon right.

20:43.79
charukaarora
Um, yeah, yeah.

20:56.80
Mary Younkin
And you know could a flower start of movement could a step could a flower spark imagination in a lot of people so that’s what I was thinking about while I created the piece and I also think it kind of you know from an art historical standpoint like having the soup can is like a very ah. You know nod to sort of pop art and it was kind of also like a fun way to incorporate the everyday object that I yeah, it’s like a fun way to incorporate the everyday objects that I had been in my paintings but in a more abstract more playful way as well.

21:21.56
charukaarora
Yeah, um, was an unusual operation. You wouldnt do yeah.

21:32.80
charukaarora
I love that so I it’s it’s also very vibrant and it feels like it’s calling to you like the moment you look at it I think it really speaks that 70 s 5 raina your work is called Kimonu girl it’s this populish beautiful girl lu lookingking

21:33.56
Mary Younkin
Yeah.

21:45.61
Ritina
More you pin.

21:51.36
charukaarora
You know backwards at you more what? what attracted to you that.

21:58.36
Ritina
I’d say first of all purple is one of my favorite colors blue is my original favorite color but purple is one I like to a lot so that’s 1 reason what attracted to me and as I grew up I had an uncle who used to stay abroad. So we.

21:59.77
charukaarora
Okay.

22:14.83
Ritina
Bought me a camin Crimino once and I just saw the design on it the way the the design moves and everything so I wanted to create the same kind of pattern on this woman’s dress.

22:15.36
charukaarora
Okay.

22:27.91
charukaarora
Okay.

22:29.68
Ritina
So it should be I wanted you to create to be more flaal because usually the Caminos have those curly designs which just kind of twist away and so for me this was like more I wanted to create it in a floral way. So that’s what. Attracted me towards this painting I wanted to some of the flast be coming out of the dress too so to give that kind of feminine to it.

22:52.63
charukaarora
Yeah, yeah, it did feel like you know, um, there’s this cherry blossom season in Japan and I had I when I saw this I felt like it had something to do with cherry blossom or something.

23:00.45
Ritina
Um, the SA.

23:03.32
Ritina
It did because that’s 1 thing which has always been there like cherry blossoms are really beautiful and mainly I wanted to show that feminism with all those flowers and everything coming out of the dress mainly. so yeah so that’s

23:07.98
charukaarora
Okay.

23:15.95
charukaarora
Yeah, and she looks beautiful too. Wonderful! Thank you so much for sharing Rebecca do do I have you because we’ve all we missed you in between the conversation.

23:21.92
Ritina
Why I did that.

23:30.35
Rebekah
Yeah, you know my laptop just decided to totally shut down on its own. It’s perfect timing. So it’s a little delayed and pixelated on my end but hopefully you can hear me see me. Okay, but sorry about that.

23:33.97
charukaarora
No problem. Perfect. So now I have your artwork. I can hear you Okay, no problem. Okay, your art work is called New Onring. It’s a beautiful.. There’s lots of flowers and greens and origins and yellows and blue flowers and it literally feels like a spring. It’s a watercolor on paper.

23:48.18
Rebekah
Okay, so.

24:02.64
charukaarora
You want to talk about this work.

24:06.51
Rebekah
So yeah, so it um my big watercolors are it’s almost like a jigsaw puzzle. They take a really long time to compose and I just spring right here when everything is in Bloom it’s it’s ah so bright and there’s so many different colors and I tried to.

24:09.68
Ritina
Yeah.

24:24.68
Rebekah
Kind of just create a big surface of of some of my favorite ones in a composition and I had honestly just purchased some really cool neon watercolors from Japan that are awesome and I was experimenting with those I had to throw the neon in there. Um, so it was pretty fun.

24:36.72
charukaarora
Ah, look 2 artists coming from inspiring from Japan. Oh.

24:44.55
Rebekah
But that’s that’s kind of it just bringing up my favorite spring flowers and composing them in a way that just made them feel alive like like I do when I walk around but springtime I guess.

24:58.88
charukaarora
Ah, it absolutely feels that way. Thank you so much. Thank you everybody for joining us. Thank you so much for sharing your inspiration your stories and your story. You know your art with all of us and 1 last question. Where can people find you and support you and how can they um, connect with you further if they like ah if if they’re interested who wants to go First. You can mention your Instagram website. Whatever you like.

25:29.30
Mary Younkin
I can go first? Um, yeah, you can follow me on Instagram at yunken studio and and then if you’re in the Brooklyn area you can come visit my studio at green point open Studios this June the first weekend of June and so I welcome you to come say hi.

25:45.31
charukaarora
Okay, man for yes, go ahead. Zena you can say.

25:47.25
Mary Younkin
And then most yeah, so.

25:50.96
Ritina
Yeah, so for me I have my website. It’s so Ritina and soerfinance.com so you can find me there find my books over there on Instagram is ritina finance and on Facebook again, it’s ritina finance so you can find my artworks there. If you’re interested in buying my website withina suka finance is so available where you can buy out.

26:14.37
charukaarora
Perfect. Thank you so much. Yes, Claire how can we find and connect with you.

26:21.12
Claire Elliott
Ah, you can find me on Instagram as well. I met Claire Elliot art and my website is also just Claire Elliott Dot Com and then I do tend to have a work available for sale on the design website Serena and lily.com um, in their collection as well.

26:37.20
charukaarora
Perfect. Thank you so much. Yo you go Rebecca.

26:43.30
Rebekah
All right? and ah goldfish kiss just remember that name. It’s there’s a story behind it. But that’s ah my website goldfishkis dot com but then my art shop is goldfishkisgoodds.com so probably shouldn have ble with that one and then on all social. it’s it’s goldfish kiss

26:58.42
charukaarora
1 perfect. Thank you so much everybody and everybody who’s watching you can buy and support their work and everything we’ve put together in the ones that a wonderful book. You can find the link in the details and to you know, small support also goes a long way. You can share this episode like their works.

27:03.20
Rebekah
So yeah.

27:22.80
charukaarora
Follow them and just support each other I think that also really truly helps artists grow their careers and truly feel grateful for what you know we’re doing here. Thank you so much guys and I hope to see you soon again.

27:34.83
Ritina
Thank you? yes.

27:35.20
Claire Elliott
Thank you.

27:36.50
Mary Younkin
Okay, thank you.

27:36.73
Rebekah
Thank you.

27:37.77
charukaarora
Okay, 1 last question I had forgotten to answer a question sorry one last question I just wanted also just as a general feedback and you know how was you experienced being a part of the book I’m still recording so I thought I’ll just ask um, but how was your experience being a part of the book if you have any feedbacks and how we can improve. Or just your general experience. Also we can use later for you know sharing, please let us know I’d love to hear and how we can also improve for sure. Anybody.

28:12.16
Ritina
Okay, for me, it was a wonderful experience. Yes, it was and Mindy it says every time you get an email immediately saying that this is where we stand that is one thing which I really liked because it’s not that you’re like you’ve you’ve supported your art and. And you don’t know what’s going on kind of so I think every week or something or every twice a week or something we were getting emails saying that this is where we are. This is how much is completed. This is like the kind of changes you need to do so in short I’ll say that we are getting a lot of feedback from you that was really really good. You so much for that. No no, not at all, not at all.

28:48.99
charukaarora
Oh Thank you so much we thought we had overwhelmed you in that process. Perfect. Thank you so much. Um, Mary do have a feedback for us. How was your experience. Ah, being as a publishing process and being a part of the book and you know being a published artist.

29:04.56
Mary Younkin
Yeah, no I think it was a great experience I I agree with what Rotina said about the communication was really clear. The expectations were really clear. So I really appreciate that because we have to but juggle so many different things in our you know business and lives that. Um.

29:18.50
charukaarora
In.

29:22.91
Mary Younkin
It’s nice when you have that clear communication. Um, and I can’t wait to see the book.

29:28.12
charukaarora
I can’t wait. It’s I’ve been showing the copy to everybody. But yesterday I had to send a copy. Ah, you know for a final check. Otherwise I was showing the zig exact to everybody and I will everybody was so excited I wish I could have done that here as well. But it’s it’s going to ship out. Hopefully in the next few days in one week so we’re keeping our fingers crossed how about you Claire do you want to share your experience.

29:51.46
Claire Elliott
Ah, yeah I agree with everyone else. It’s been a good experience and um I have really appreciated Appreciated. Um, the transparency and communication. Um, not every project is like that so it it was been nice to see Proofs along the way over and over.. It’s really helpful. Um, and I’m really looking forward to seeing the book and seeing ah you know find discovering more artists sort of working in the sort of floral realm.

30:16.91
charukaarora
Yeah, thank you so much Rebecca if you’re here I don’t know if you’re here or not okay.

30:41.39
charukaarora
Oh wow.

30:49.45
charukaarora
Oh I want that I’m so glad to are right.

31:03.82
charukaarora
Ah, thank you so much guys I will stop.


About the Guest(s):

  • Rebekah St. – Rebekah is a talented watercolor artist based in Seattle, Washington. With a unique style inspired by tropical flowers and scenic surroundings, she brings vibrancy and life to her artwork.
  • Ritina Finance – A self-taught landscape artist originally from India and currently residing in Tennessee, Ritina delves into acrylics and oils to capture the beauty of nature. Her work reflects her appreciation for the aesthetic appeal of landscapes.
  • Mary Younkin – Mary, a painter based in Brooklyn, New York, specializes in water-based mediums like acrylics and watercolors. Her work often features neon pigments and portrays a narrative through vibrant colors.
  • Claire Elliott – Residing in Portland, Oregon, Claire is an oil painter whose artistic focus lies in capturing the essence of nature through detailed and vibrant compositions.

Key Takeaways:

  • Artists find inspiration in various elements, such as nature, personal experiences, and family, shaping their unique creative voices.
  • Motherhood can influence artistic expression, leading to new perspectives, themes, and subject matter in their work.
  • Watercolor, acrylics, oils, and mixed media play a vital role in their artistic exploration, allowing for diverse interpretations and expressions.
  • The importance of storytelling through art emerges as a common theme, connecting artists with viewers and creating meaningful narratives.
  • The power of vibrant colors, intricate details, and unique compositions adds depth and character to their artwork, inviting viewers into their imaginative worlds.

Notable Quotes:

  • “It’s a compulsion at this point, a drive to document my experience of the world and share a narrative with other people.” – Mary Younkin
  • “I’m interested in how the paint moves on the canvas and adjusting colors and compositions based on what’s already present.” – Claire Elliott
  • “I love neon watercolors, which inspired me to introduce vibrant colors into my paintings, creating a compelling visual story.” – Rebekah St.

Don’t miss this insightful episode featuring talented artists discussing their creative processes, inspirations, and journeys in the world of art. Tune in to the “Arts To Hearts” podcast for more enriching conversations with artists from various disciplines.

Charuka Arora is the founder of the Arts to Hearts Project and Host of the Arts to Hearts Podcast. She is also an acclaimed Indian artist known for her contemporary embellished paintings. Her unique blend of gouache, collage, embroidery, painting, and drawing explores the intersection of art, culture, heritage, and womanhood. Through her work, she tells stories of female strength and encapsulates them in pieces that can be treasured for generations.

 Arts to Hearts Project Gallery + Studio

Charuka’s work draws inspiration from Hindu mythology, recognizing women as vessels of Shakti, the cosmic energy. She beautifully portrays powerful goddesses like Durga Maa riding a tiger or lion, symbolizing their unlimited power to protect virtue and combat evil.

Through her art, Charuka invites us into the world of women, showcasing their beauty, strength, and resilience. Her creations not only exhibit exceptional talent but also serve as an inspiration and a symbol of hope for those challenging societal norms.

About Arts to Hearts Project Gallery + Studio

Arts to Hearts Podcast is a show delving into the lives and passions of renowned artists. From running creative businesses and studio art practices to cultivating a successful mindset, Charuka Arora engages in heartfelt conversations with her guests. Experience your personal happy hour with your favorite artists, right in your studio.

Through candid discussions, Charuka and her guests reveal the joys and challenges of a vibrant creative life, both within and beyond our studios. Get ready to be inspired and uplifted as you tune in.

  • Rebekah St. – Rebekah is a talented watercolor artist based in Seattle, Washington. With a unique style inspired by tropical flowers and scenic surroundings, she brings vibrancy and life to her artwork.

  • Ritina Ansurkar – A self-taught landscape artist originally from India and currently residing in Tennessee, Ritina delves into acrylics and oils to capture the beauty of nature. Her work reflects her appreciation for the aesthetic appeal of landscapes.

  • Mary Younkin – Mary, a painter based in Brooklyn, New York, specializes in water-based mediums like acrylics and watercolors. Her work often features neon pigments and portrays a narrative through vibrant colors.
  • Claire Elliott – Residing in Portland, Oregon, Claire is an oil painter whose artistic focus lies in capturing the essence of nature through detailed and vibrant compositions.

In the final episode of the Arts to Hearts Podcast series on the “Floral Art Book,” host Charuka Arora brought together four inspiring artists. Each shared their unique journeys through the lens of floral artistry. This gathering wasn’t just informative; it was a celebration of creativity and personal expression.

Marie Younkin: Painting with Neon

Charuka introduced us first to Marie Younkin from Brooklyn. Marie is renowned for her vibrant use of neon pigments in water-based media. She shared how her artwork acts as a narrative, expressing her personal view of the world around her.

“With the flower movement of the ’70s and how do we resist peacefully and use flowers as a symbol of power.” Mary Younkin

Claire Elliott: Inspired by Nature

Next, we met Claire Elliott from Portland, Oregon. As an oil painter, Claire draws profound inspiration from nature. She detailed how the natural world shapes her work, infusing it with life and energy.

“I’ve found that even when I’m working in other jobs, all I want to do is come back to something creative. I have a hard time sitting still and not making something.” Claire Elliott

Ritina: From Hobby to Profession

From Tennessee, Ritina joined the conversation. Originally from India, she transitioned from painting as a hobby to embracing it as a professional career. Ritina’s love for landscapes fills her work, capturing the tranquility and beauty of her surroundings.

Rebekah: Watercolors and Scenic Imagery

Rebekah, hailing from the Seattle area, rounded out the group. Her watercolor paintings often reflect her past experiences living near the beach, with tropical flowers and scenic views playing a prominent role in her art.

“I didn’t stop painting, but it’s something that just propels me. It grounded me and forced me to really focus on art.” Rebekah

The Drive to Create

During the podcast, each artist explored their motivations. The discussion revealed a common theme: art as a necessity, a compulsion that enriches their lives. Whether driven by personal experiences or inspired by the external world, their passion for art was palpable.

Reflecting on the Floral Art Book

The artists reflected on their participation in the “Floral Art Book.” They appreciated the collaborative spirit and effective communication throughout the project. This experience not only showcased their work but also connected them with a community of like-minded artists.

Connecting with the Artists

As the episode wrapped up, each artist shared where listeners could find and support their work. They provided details on their social media platforms and websites, inviting everyone to explore their artistic worlds further.

A Look Ahead

Charuka encouraged listeners to continue supporting the arts. She emphasized how simple acts like sharing an episode or purchasing artwork can make a significant difference in an artist’s career. The discussion hinted at the exciting creative paths these artists will continue to explore.

Conclusion

The Arts to Hearts Podcast’s final episode on the “Floral Art Book” series offered a deep dive into the lives and inspirations of four talented artists. It celebrated their achievements and offered listeners a glimpse into the passionate world of artistic creation.

Call For Art: Art and Woman Edition 1-2024-https://submit.artstoheartsproject.com/art-and-woman-call-for-art/

Win US $10,000 worth prizes and cash award. So, have a look at https://submit.artstoheartsproject.com/emerging-woman-artist-award-ath-art-prize/


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