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Want to be more consistent with your studio practice? Try this

Creating a steady art practice is something many artists struggle with, but few discuss. It’s the skill that separates artists who keep going and improving from those who lose their motivation or let long stretches pass without picking up a brush. 

In the world of art, being creative is limitless, but keeping a steady art studio routine can be tough for artists, even if they’re really talented. If you’ve ever found it hard to stop procrastinating, deal with creative blocks, or find motivation in your studio, don’t worry – you’re not the only one. But why is it so tough to find the time and courage to paint, even when we really want to?

The missing piece here is being consistent. How can you form a habit of regularly going to your studio and using your brush to improve your skills, even when you’re tempted by time constraints and fears that keep you from painting? This is a common challenge, and we know life can sometimes get in the way of your creative time, but with the right approach, you can overcome these challenges.

and in this blog, we’re going to uncover how to conquer these hurdles. We’ll explore the art of sticking to your creative routine, no matter what tries to pull you away from it.

Find your reasons 

Thomas Jefferson once said:

“If you know why you’re doing something, you’ll always figure out how to do it.” 

So, take a moment to think about why you want to be consistent. Is it because it makes you happy? Do you want to share your thoughts with others? Or maybe creating things helps you feel better. Your reasons are as special as your art.

One reason could be that lot’s of artists struggle with not having a clear art style. This often means their work looks kind of all over the place. They might also feel bad for wanting to try different things.

We all want to make art that looks the same, at least sometimes, but it’s not easy. The word “amateur” is kind of negative, but it’s important to know that becoming a pro artist takes longer than we think, especially if we don’t make art regularly. 

Understanding your “why” is like having a roadmap. It helps you stay on course, especially when you’re feeling unsure or when life gets busy and you’re tempted to put your creative time aside.

Building a consistent studio practice takes time. It’s frustrating because we think we should be doing it when we’re just starting to learn art. This start might take years, which is normal. Here are some tips that can help you stay consistent and maintain that studio practice:

Take small steps, give yourself your daily 10 minute appointment 

It’s no secret that small consistent steps can lead to significant changes in your life. Think about it: just ten minutes a day dedicated to something that matters to you can make a world of difference. It’s like planting seeds that grow into strong, healthy habits.

So, here’s a simple and effective strategy: pick a 10-minute window in your daily schedule, and treat it as seriously as a doctor’s appointment. Mark it on your calendar, set a reminder, and commit to this brief yet impactful practice.

What could be more important than investing in your health and fulfillment? This daily commitment can be a game-changer. Whether you use this time to engage in physical activity, practice mindfulness, work on a creative project, or simply reflect on your goals, those ten minutes are a gift to yourself.

Remember, it’s not about the duration; it’s about the consistency. Over time, these small daily appointments will pave the way for a healthier, more fulfilling life.

Find something you love to do

To maintain a consistent and fulfilling studio practice, there’s one essential step – finding something that truly captivates you. It’s about falling in love with a specific aspect of your art, be it a composition, a color palette, a subject matter, or a unique form of expression.

This ‘falling in love’ part holds the key to keeping your flame burning brightly. It’s what motivates you to return to your creative space with enthusiasm and dedication. The interesting twist is that this process involves a fair share of exploration. You’ll find your true passion by trying various approaches, admiring different artworks, and allowing yourself to indulge your curiosity.

In reality, honing in on a single focus often means experimenting and rejecting many options that don’t quite connect with you. The journey of self-discovery is all about uncovering that one thing that sparks your passion and keeps you coming back for more.

Stop self-judging your art

When a painting doesn’t quite live up to your expectations, it’s easy to let it speak loudly in your mind, suggesting that you might be wasting your time. It’s as if each artwork is a measure of your worth as an artist. But the truth is, your creative journey is not determined by any single piece.

What about those times when a painting turns out beautifully? Surprisingly, success can sometimes be a double-edged sword. It’s almost like a creativity killer. You look at that outstanding painting and doubt whether you can ever create something as brilliant again. This self-imposed pressure can make you hesitant to pick up your tools and paint once more.

But here’s the important thing: Don’t let self-judgment dictate your path. Art is about exploration and growth. Every painting, whether it meets your expectations or not, contributes to your journey. Remember, your worth as an artist is not tied to individual pieces but to your resilience, passion, and willingness to keep painting.

So, embrace the imperfections, learn from both your successes and your perceived failures, and let them guide you forward. Your artistry is a journey filled with ups and downs, but it’s in these moments of self-judgment that you have the opportunity to grow and thrive as an artist.

Search for the truth behind your excuses

We’ve all been there, caught in the web of excuses that seem to hold our creative practice hostage. “I don’t have time to paint,” “I’m not creative enough,” “I can’t do this.” These are the excuses that can easily creep into our minds.

However, let’s be honest; do excuses genuinely belong in the discussion? In reality, they often serve as a mask for something deeper, something more significant that’s affecting your journey.

Excuses are like the smoke that conceals the true fire beneath. They might be disguising a lack of self-confidence, a fear of criticism, or perhaps even the pressure of perfectionism. When you say, “I don’t have time to paint,” maybe what you mean is, “I’m overwhelmed by other commitments,” or “I’m struggling to prioritize my creative time.”

“I’m not creative” might be covering up self-doubt or the belief that creativity is reserved for a select few. And when you say, “I can’t,” it could be fear of failure or the unknown that’s holding you back.

Excuses are often a way of protecting ourselves from confronting these deeper issues. Acknowledging and addressing these underlying concerns is the key to unlocking your full potential. So, shift your focus from excuses to the real reasons that might be hindering the thriving art practice you desire. 

In the end..

In the grand scheme of things, we’re all handed the same 24 hours each day. The key to a consistent art practice isn’t about conforming to someone else’s routine but about finding what truly works for you. And here’s a secret: there’s no one-size-fits-all formula for consistency.

Don’t get caught up in counting the minutes you spend on your art. Instead, focus on the quality of your practice. Remember that your primary role as an artist is to nurture your own fulfillment.

The magic lies in showing up, day in and day out. It’s not about painting every single day, but about showing up for yourself, your art, and your creative journey. Consistency isn’t just about creating art; it’s about being present for your own growth and happiness.

So, remember, it’s your commitment to the journey that matters most. Show up, daily, for the artist in you. Your canvas awaits, your art awaits, and your fulfillment awaits. Keep creating, keep thriving, and keep being you. 

Want some more ideas to maintain that studio consistency?

Introducing the Art’s to Hearts (ATH) Club – a haven crafted exclusively for artists seeking connection, sharing, and the exploration of their artistic journeys. Within the walls of this online art community, you’ll find a sanctuary designed to help you grow and thrive as an artist.

In the ATH Club, we understand that being an artist can often feel overwhelming. That’s why we’ve created a safe space where artists of all levels can come together to share, learn, and embark on their creative journeys. Whether you’re a beginner, grappling with artistic challenges, or a seasoned artist with success stories to tell, this club is your haven.

What sets the ATH Club apart is its focus on your specific needs as an artist. You’ll discover a wealth of blogs thoughtfully categorized to address those unique needs, offering insights and guidance tailored to your creative path. These blogs are your companions in understanding, growth, and progress.

But it doesn’t stop there. The ATH Club is all about forging connections with fellow artists who share your thoughts, your struggles, and your aspirations. Exchange ideas, support one another, and celebrate each other’s successes as you traverse the artistic landscape together.

To make your journey even more captivating, we’ve spiced things up with games and art-related quizzes. These fun activities are designed to refresh your spirit and refine your skills. Plus, there’s so much more to explore.

So, if you’re ready to embark on a journey filled with endless possibilities and growth, 

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